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Collectable Ivy

The Ivy League Today by Frederic A. Birmingham

$60.00

The Ivy League Today by Frederic A. Birmingham

$60.00
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The Ivy League Today by Frederic A. Birmingham, hardcover book with dust jacket, both in very good condition. Published in 1961 by Thomas Y. Crowell Company, New York. The subtitle is A light-hearted reappraisal of all 8 colleges. Birmingham (Dartmouth '33) spent nearly three years visiting the Ivy campuses, talking with students and comparing one school to another. The quote below is from the book jacket blurb: "Students all over America are clamoring to get into one of the eight Ivy League colleges. This is the first book to show the layman just how these venerable schools shape up today. The combined enrollment of the eight schools on only 29,700 male students, a small proportion of the total college enrollment. Brown is training its freshman and sophomores to think for themselves it its Identification Criticism of Ideas curriculum. Columbia's magnificent Contemporary Civilization course has been widely imitated. But Columbia alone among the Ivy group wants to double its college enrollment in the next few years and raise its academic standards so high that only half of its present undergraduates could even gain admission there. Cornell is managing to stress a liberal-arts approach to education, even though it is the largest and most complicated school in the League. At Dartmouth seniors must take the Great Issues course. This means reading The New York Times and other periodicals regularly; listening to outside lecturers like Dean Acheson, Harold Urey, and Clement Attlee; and trying to apply  to present-day problems the knowledge they have gained during four years of college. Harvard is still tops academically, and still favors complete intellectual freedom for students and faculty alike. At Pennsylvania, President Gaylord P. Hornwell, a foremost atomic scientist, not only administers a sprawling university  but teaches a freshman class himself to keep his hand in. Princeton offers three unique programs: in American Civilization, in Creative Arts, and in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. At Yale, President Griswold has been trying to stimulate the exceptional student with the new Directed Studies Program." A really neat period book

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